Patients Rights Action Fund
  • About

    The mission of the Patients' Rights Action Fund (PRAF) is to provide financial and strategic support throughout the U.S. to protect the rights of patients and people with disabilities by opposing doctor prescribed suicide legislation. PRAF is the national coordinated movement to oppose efforts to make suicide a medical treatment and to promote measures that protect patients' civil rights. We connect new and existing grassroots organizations to build coalitions that oppose doctor prescribed suicide on the state level. We track and follow legalization efforts across multiple states, and provide resources to strategic opposition efforts. Read More
  • Contribute

    The movement to legalize doctor prescribed suicide is gaining momentum, but we have had significant victories in the fight to protect patients, people with disabilities and the most vulnerable. Success in these battles is not possible without your support. Please consider making a financial contribution to our cause and staying connected with us by signing up for our email alerts. We can't do it without your help. Read More
  • Join the Effort

    PRAF is only as strong as our network of supporters. Stay connected and help us fight to protect patients' and people with disabilities' civil rights. Please sign up for our email alerts and consider making a financial contribution to our cause. We can't do it without your help. Read More
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Disabled rights advocates fight assisted suicide legislation

by Anna Gorman, Kaiser Health News

June 28, 2015

When he was 19, Anthony Orefice hit a telephone pole on his motorcycle going 100 miles per hour. Doctors told his family he wouldn't survive. He did, but the accident left him paralyzed from the chest down, unable to do what he loved -- surf, snowboard or ride dirt bikes."All you are thinking is the worst, worst, worst – everything you can't do," said Orefice, who lives in Valencia, Calif. "I wanted to be dead."

Read more: Disabled rights advocates fight assisted suicide legislation

Opinion: Physician-assisted suicide puts the vulnerable at risk

Stephanie Packer, a mom fighting a terminal lung disease, explains why she opposes California's Senate Bill 128

June 24, 2015 7:30PM ET

by Stephanie Packer - Posted by Al Jazeera America

In the past year, lawmakers in two dozen states have put controversial end-of-life bills up for debate. Across the country, there is growing support to allow terminally ill patients to end their lives with a prescription pill, but only five states now allow medically assisted suicide. In California, a bill that could legalize medically assisted suicide is making its way through the state Legislature. Stephanie Packer, who is battling a terminal lung disease, says she thinks passing it would be a huge mistake.

In 2012, after suffering a series of debilitating lung infections, a doctor diagnosed me with scleroderma, an autoimmune disease that causes a hardening of the skin and, in some cases, other organs. Given the progression of my disease, my doctor told me that I had three years to live.

Read more: Opinion: Physician-assisted suicide puts the vulnerable at risk

Democrats Shouldn't Endorse Suicide

By Dr. Ira Byock
Politico Magazine
June 7, 2015

 

As a life-long progressive who is rapidly approaching Medicare age, I am dismayed by the apparent resignation of the political left to the sorry state of dying in America. Just when moral outrage and radical social change are called for, my fellow progressives have embraced physician-assisted suicide as their political response to needless suffering of seriously ill people. This isn’t liberalism; it’s nihilism.

 

This liberal embrace of hastened death is spreading rapidly. In California, a bill to legalize doctor-assisted suicide passed the state senate last Thursday and is headed for the state assembly. In common with similar legislation in over 20 states, it was authored and co-sponsored by Democratic lawmakers touting civil liberties as their motivation.

Read more: Democrats Shouldn't Endorse Suicide

Assisted suicide bill fails in Maine Legislature

Despite passage by the House, Senate support falls one vote short.

June 17, 2015
The Associated Press

AUGUSTA – Maine lawmakers have defeated a bill that would have allowed doctors to provide lethal doses of medication to terminally ill patients.

Republican Sen. Roger Katz’s bill died Tuesday because the Senate and House failed to agree on the bill.

The Republican-controlled Senate narrowly rejected the bill with an 18-17 vote earlier this week. The Democratic-led House supported it with a 76-70 vote.

Katz and other supporters said that people who don’t have much time left to live should be free to end their life when they are ready. But opponents said lawmakers should focus on expanding access to palliative care. They said they feared it would send the message that the state of Maine condones suicide.

Five states currently allow dying patients to end their lives under a doctor’s care.

The Assisted-Suicide Movement Goes on Life Support

A George Soros-backed effort in California has stalled, the latest sign of weak backing for the deadly practice.

Published by - The Wall Street Journal

By AARON KHERIATY
May 22, 2015

In the past 20 years, more than 100 campaigns to legalize assisted suicide have been introduced in various states. All but three have failed.

In 2012 the same Massachusetts voters who elected Elizabeth Warren and re-elected Barack Obama gave the thumbs down to doctor-assisted suicide. Compassion & Choices—the “death with dignity” organization formerly called the Hemlock Society—saw a 40-point lead in Massachusetts polls evaporate on election day, despite millions of dollars in campaign spending. Bills this year in Connecticut, Maryland and Colorado also failed after legislators took a closer look at assisted suicide.

Read more: The Assisted-Suicide Movement Goes on Life Support

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